The science behind UX: eyetracking

eyetracking visualizes how our eyes view information

Eyetracking can produce heat maps to visualize how we view content. Source: Nielson Norman Group; www.nngroup.com/articles/f-shaped-pattern-reading-web-content/

Design is not just an art, there is hard science behind it. Googling the term UX comes up with the following definition: “User Experience (UX) involves a person’s behaviors, attitudes, and emotions about using a particular product, system or service. User experience includes the practical, experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human–computer interaction and product ownership.” The science behind design and UX can be studied using eyetracking devices to help scientists better understand how we view and consume content online.

Did you know that there is an eyetracking lab at Clemson? I didn’t until a few weeks ago when I met with Dr. Andrew Duchowski, Clemson Computer Science professor and eyetracking expert. Continue…

Scaling Your UX Strategy

Although this is the last paragraph that I am quoting below, I think this article as a whole is a great exploration into UX and where companies are moving (or need to be) to stay ahead of the curve. As consumers, we demand ever simpler, yet more robust user experience that functions properly across all our different devices. Time to get to development, that is a hard mark to hit!

It is easy to see that there are a few common ingredients across these different strategies, such as executive commitment, access to customers, new technical prototyping skills, and small, interdisciplinary teams. All of these ingredients are critical not only to UX, but also to developing the sort of bottom-up, risk-taking culture that is central to succeeding in the 21st century market. These skills are standard in the startup market where UX is increasingly appreciated as a key to success and value creation. The startup market is creating a new breed of business executives, like Jack Dorsey of Twitter and Square, who are impatient with requirements-driven waterfall product development processes. They think “UX-first”. The big challenge now is to drive these same skills into the more traditional, top-down management culture at big companies. The companies that get it right will be either be at the forefront of disrupting business or much more likely to thrive in the era of disruption.

Continue reading full article here: via Scaling Your UX Strategy – Robert Fabricant – Harvard Business Review.