Love-hate relationship with typography

love-hate typography

We all have days where we have a love-hate relationship with typography and choosing the best font.

Although there are no rules (see rule #5 in the article) when it comes to choosing the right font family for your website or printed design, there are still some typography rules, right? Looking through a font website such as google.com/fonts, typekit.com, or dafont.com can be overwhelming even if you consider yourself a typography addict, but this article is factual and can really help you sort out which font will best serve your layout, whether it is your newest website or a logo design. I especially love how the article simplifies font choices and compares it to looking through your closet.

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“What Font Should I Use?”: Five Principles for Choosing and Using Typefaces – Smashing Magazine
For many beginners, the task of picking fonts is a mystifying process. There seem to be endless choices — from normal, conventional-looking fonts to novelty candy cane fonts and bunny fonts — with no way of understanding the options, only never-ending lists of categories and recommendations. Selecting the right typeface is a mixture of firm rules and loose intuition, and takes years of experience to develop a feeling for. Here are five guidelines for picking and using fonts that I’ve developed in the course of using and teaching typography.

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Typography is not just pretty fonts

Web typography is not just pretty fonts

Web typography is not just pretty fonts

A student found passed this article along to me and I think it is a fantastic article dealing with typography on the web. For years web designers were stuck with minimal choices for fonts in order to ensure display compatibility for many end users. Then along came font squirrel and google fonts and now web designers can rejoice in the freedom of their non-web designer counterparts!

But this article hits on some really important points that should be considered by all designers including both print and web. We can’t just fall in love with a font and use it under any circumstances. Typography is an art and as such, thought and deep consideration should be involved when choosing the best font for a specific job.

Simply put, typography is the art and technique of arranging type. It encompasses every possible element that can affect web design, including choice of typeface, color palette, line length, point size, layout, and design integration.”

Continue…

Designing for a Responsive Web Means Starting with Type First

Type matters. How to use typography in responsive web design

Making responsiveness only about grids, responsive images and media queries is a disservice to customers and brands. It needs to be about providing readable content for any device, and that means starting with type.

The pervasiveness of mobile devices today means audiences want to consume content on whichever browser or device they prefer. As a result, web designers and publishers have rallied behind the idea of responsive design to reach the widest possible audience and promise the reader a great experience no matter what their screen size. But in our rush to make sites work well across a plethora of mobile devices, tablets and desktops, many of us have overlooked a crucial concept: we should be designing for the reader, not the device. Continue…

Prototyping Responsive Typography

As a designer, I want everyone who sees my work to see it exactly as I intended it to display. If the font changes size or family, the colors don’t display right, the images are squished, my intention as a designer has not been conveyed well to the viewer. In other words, you are not seeing my design. How do we make sure that the type we create for websites looks like we intend it to?

The history of typography dates back about 5,000 years. It starts from a series of pictograms, which then evolved to hieroglyphs in Egypt and later around 1,200 BC to Phoenician alphabets. Almost 2,500 years later the Chinese invented first movable type which later revolutionized everything in the west when Gutenberg invented latin movable type. Many of the basic concepts of typesetting are still the same as 500 years ago.

Web typography, and digital typography in general, is a huge step forward in this history. It has made setting type fast and easy compared with hand-setting metal type. Responsiveness, when added on top of this, makes this period of change we are living very fascinating. Not only is centuries old design theory being rewritten, but the process of how design happens is now changing too (as Mark Boulton states it). Continue…

Logo Designs for Inspiration

Collection of the best logo designs of 2012.

Collection of the best logo designs of 2012.

Designing your company logo, colors, and fonts can be one of the most important branding choices a company makes. This list by Awwwards includes some of the more creative logo designs and fonts I’ve seen in a long time. Using fonts to show what a company provides a customer a quick and creative glance at what a company is all about. So the question is what is your logo design and/or font saying about you?

Achieving a well designed logo requires really hard work and being up to date with the latest trends in design. It’s probably the best way of establishing brand identity, making an impact on customers and ensuring that they’ll remember your site and come back for a second visit. Most logos communicate ideas, for instance the kind of quality services a company can provide for its customers.

Today we’ve gathered 99 creative logo designs for your inspiration, hope you find them useful.

See all the logos here: 99 Creative Logo Designs for Inspiration.

No more web font constraints!

Yeah for no more web font constraints!

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Google Web Fonts
Hundreds of free, open-source fonts optimized for the web. Just 3 quick steps between you and a good lookin’ website. 1. Choose: Search or browse hundreds of font families, then add the ones you like …

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