Lighting for athlete portraits

lighting for athlete potraitsIn the article below, we get a peak inside the brain of Cuarezma, photographer of the World Cup’s US Soccer team. The athlete portraits were taken outdoors, but used a ton of controlled lighting (think 10 soft boxes!) to supplement the natural light.

My favorite part of the article was the sketched notes where he is thinking through how to get the most versatile collection of athlete portraits in a short amount of time. He has it set up to capture 30 athletes in 30 minutes, getting 4 unique shots of each player. By having a white backdrop behind the subject and a black board at a right angle, he was able to get a front shot with a white background and a profile shot with a black background with no change in setup and almost no down time between shots. Continue…

Studio lighting: painting with light

Once discovered, studio lighting can become a photographer’s best friend. With studio lighting, you are no longer having to wait for golden hour or the perfect cloudy day to capture your subject, you can recreate perfect lighting any time of the day or night with a little bit of knowledge and practice. As a photographer who loved shooting outdoor portraits, once I begin to understand the extent of control and possibilities of controlled lighting setups, I was hooked!

With studio lighting, a photographer can literally “paint” his or her subject with light and shadows. By deciding where on the subject you want a shadow to fall and choosing the right type of light source, the manipulation of light and shadows on your subject is endless. And even more importantly for a beginning studio photographer, it is predictable and repeatable. Light travels in a straight line until it hit something where it is either absorbed or reflected.

Continue…

Liquid studio photography by Alex Koloskov

How cool are these photographs? Liquid studio photography by Alex Koloskov. We might have missed the training webinar (which I am sure would have been amazing), but it is always a pleasure to look through Alex’s liquid photographs. Do you think we are ready to try an experiment like this in the Godfrey Photolab? What equipment would we need still to capture liquid studio photography? How could we protect the room and equipment if we set something like this up in Godfrey? I’d love to try it if anyone else is interested!

Touching up a male portrait in Photoshop

Touching up a male portrait in Photoshop

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Realistic Portrait Retouching With Photoshop | Psdtuts+
This photo retouching tutorial will show you how to keep your retouched images clean and realistic.

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Need ideas for editing portraits in Photoshop

Need ideas for editing your studio portraits?

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Retouch a Bland Model Portrait in Photoshop | Psdtuts+
In this tutorial, we will add makeup, repair flaws, and add drama to a bland model portrait.

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Product Photography in the studio

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Product Photography notes

After setting up the stations for product photography in the studio, I enjoyed a moment to capture some of the pieces of jewelry. Especially catching were the shots taken in the soft box. A soft box allows products to be lit with a very diffused even lighting and adding the reflective, lit panel at the bottom of the soft box lights the product from all sides and provides an attractive reflection beneath.

The goal in any product photography is to make the item look as appealing as possible. In some cases that means making it seem bigger than life and removing it from all the distractions of the surroundings. On the beads and the black watch, I love how the products actually seem suspended in a solid white cloud. There are no noticeable lines or distractions from the background- it is all about the piece of jewelry. Continue…