Interaction design and web animations

Animation timing and interaction design

Animation timing and interaction design

Have you ever thought about what makes a particular app great? You know, something about the design just feels right?

All of the design decisions- from fonts to colors to graphics to motion effects- on an app or website work together to create a consistent feeling in users. Sometimes the combined effect is positive and we love to shop, visit, play at a particular site and other times it just feels wrong and we are not likely to purchase or visit that site again.

According to this article, Guidelines for Animation Timing, a lot of our perception of great design comes from what happens in the in between states, which is called interaction design. Think of hovering, clicking, motion animations- those sorts of things. Some examples of interaction design is how the page turns when we are reading a Kindle book or how an app reacts when we click on an internal link. Continue…

Data is necessary for design decisions

Netflix redesign relies on dataAs graphic designers, we often feel like we know instinctually how to best design a website, logo, or brochure. It is true that the more practice you have in any art, the more you develop keen instincts on how to create better artwork, but it is probably a little dangerous to rely solely on instinct when designing successful client projects.

Have you noticed how often Google services change the layout of their products? Sometimes the constant changes are enough to drive you crazy, but sometimes you go to the page and think “wow, they must have heard my thoughts, this site is so much easier to use now!” Continue…

Love-hate relationship with typography

love-hate typography

We all have days where we have a love-hate relationship with typography and choosing the best font.

Although there are no rules (see rule #5 in the article) when it comes to choosing the right font family for your website or printed design, there are still some typography rules, right? Looking through a font website such as google.com/fonts, typekit.com, or dafont.com can be overwhelming even if you consider yourself a typography addict, but this article is factual and can really help you sort out which font will best serve your layout, whether it is your newest website or a logo design. I especially love how the article simplifies font choices and compares it to looking through your closet.

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“What Font Should I Use?”: Five Principles for Choosing and Using Typefaces – Smashing Magazine
For many beginners, the task of picking fonts is a mystifying process. There seem to be endless choices — from normal, conventional-looking fonts to novelty candy cane fonts and bunny fonts — with no way of understanding the options, only never-ending lists of categories and recommendations. Selecting the right typeface is a mixture of firm rules and loose intuition, and takes years of experience to develop a feeling for. Here are five guidelines for picking and using fonts that I’ve developed in the course of using and teaching typography.

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Guerilla marketing gets attention

Guerilla marketing need not be expensive, just incredibly creative

Guerilla marketing need not be expensive, just incredibly creative

We all have heard the story from a friend or family member trying to market their new start-up company- Advertising is too expensive, I can’t get in front of my audience. Well this article challenges that thought process by saying if we think outside the box and come up with something unique, it need not be expensive to be effective at reaching your market. Some may consider these examples gimmicky, but I say that the mere fact that people photograph the advertisements and post them online means that they are effective at grabbing attention.

From the article:

If you don’t know what Guerilla Marketing is, it is a term coined by Jay Conrad Levinson from his 1984 book, “Guerilla Marketing.”  According to good ‘ol Wikipedia, Guerilla Marketing is the following:

“An advertising strategy in which low-cost unconventional means (graffiti, sticker bombing, flash mobs) are utilized, often in a localized fashion or large network of individual cells, to convey or promote a product or an idea.” Continue…

Photoshop tutorial #GC3400

AdobeTV creates a wonderful collection of Photoshop tutorials for beginners and experts alike that cover all the different software found in Adobe Creative Cloud and used for your courses in ClemsonGC. This particular photoshop tutorial is one I ran across based on a recent student’s question on how to masking images into text. I hope that you find the information useful for your current and future Photoshop projects #GC3400.

Reshared post from +Adobe Photoshop

There are many ways to show a photograph within type or graphics. In this tutorial, Julieanne Kost uses groups and clipping masks:

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#GC3400 is tagged as one of Clemson’s most unique classes

Visual guide to Adobe keyboard shortcuts

At ClemsonGC, we are constantly moving between the Adobe Creative Suite programs. One of the more frustrating aspects of using all of the programs is the lack of continuity between the programs in regards to keyboard shortcuts. I was thrilled when I came across this great visual guide from Going Home to Roost and I look forward to printing out these to hang above my desk.

Regularly using Adobe shortcuts can drastically reduce the amount of time spent working on a project and therefore earn you more time playing out in the sunshine or spending time with your buds. So don’t miss the chance to print these out and increase your productivity as a designer today!

Adobe keyboard shortcuts Continue…

Effectiveness of flipping the classroom

Alright, it is infographic time again! As many of you may know, I am a bit fascinated with alternative options for learning and flipping the classroom is one of the recent buzz words in the world of higher education. I love that ClemsonGC is a hands on, lab-based program. In the lab, you can see when someone really “gets it.” Those moments when everything comes together and all the theory makes sense in practice, not just in lecture.

In the world of education, “flipped classroom” has become a recent buzz word, but what does it really mean? There has been much research done on the topic lately and some of it finds that flipping a classroom has dramatically successful results and other research shows no difference or even a decline in student success using this method. As with any educational tool, if used in a way that doesn’t help students grasp the material.  Continue…